With marijuana decriminalization on the rise in the United States, many people might expect to see more sophisticated systems of labeling and identification in their newly sanctioned cannabis products.

medical-marijuana

Unlike tobacco, however, marijuana is decidedly more difficult to obtain and research considering its illicit history.

“As a result, pot science has to run to catch up with America’s new landscape,” Mental Floss reported in a March 16 article, “and the results have been spotty.”

According to a June 2015 study of 75 medical cannabis products, only 17 percent were accurately labeled. Twenty-three percent were underlabeled, and 60 percent were overlabeled in regards to THC content.

Edible marijuana products, such as brownies and cookies, compound these difficulties even further.

holding-brownie

“The cannabis plant itself is easy enough to test, but when you add flour, sugar, and butter, things get complicated,” Mental Floss continued. “Most labs use a machine called a high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC). But HPLCs were designed to handle refined chemicals, not baked goods.”

Luckily, gas chromatography (in conjunction with QuEChERS) has shown promise in tackling the sweet stuff:

Check out this recent application note on the Extraction and GC/MS Analysis of Cannabinoids from Brownies >>>

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2 thoughts on “Addressing Cannabis Research Challenges with Gas Chromatography”

    1. Thanks so much for the feedback. However, this was a direct quote from Mental Floss. While most chromatography users are aware of the proper verbiage, the distinction can be (understandably) tricky. 🙂

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