The Science of Fidget Spinners

Pardon this spin-terruption, but we have exciting news. Phenomenex has officially been fidget-ized! …Spin-terized? …Spin-sonified? Whatever you want to call it, we have joined the continuing fad of fidget spinners, or as we like to call them, Phegit™ spinners! At first, many were reluctant. Having never spun the spun, it Continue Reading

A New Test Uses a Single Drop of Blood to Screen for 13 Types of Cancer

A team of researchers in a Tokyo-based National Cancer Center (NCC) has developed a new blood test that can diagnose 13 types of cancer, as originally reported by The Japan News. With more than 100 types of cancer, there are many variables, and diagnoses can sometimes come too late. The Japanese team Continue Reading

The Science of Slushies

Earlier this week, the convenience store chain 7-Eleven, celebrated their day, July 11th, by doling out millions of free small Slurpees to their customers. However, while guzzling down your free frozen slush, did you think about the complicated chemistry that goes into making the famous cold brews? The signature frozen Continue Reading

Kinetex HPLC/UHPLC Columns Win the Gold Seal of Quality from Leading Industry Publication, SelectScience

    Torrance, Calif. (July, 2017) – Phenomenex Inc, global leader in the research, design, and manufacture of advanced technologies for the separation sciences, announced today that its Kinetex® Core-Shell HPLC/UHPLC columns have won the Gold Seal of Quality by SelectScience, an industry leading online publication. The SelectScience® Gold Seal Continue Reading

Three New Things Science Says About Dads

(article via Smithsonian.com) Fathers can have a significant effect on their children By Kat Eschner smithsonian.com June 16, 2017 10:00AM Recent studies of fatherhood have provided more detail to something many of us know instinctively: dads can have a big effect on their children. Parenthood is a lot of responsibility, Continue Reading

Nobel Prize Winner Recognized Decades After Artemisinin Discovery

On October 5, 84-year-old Chinese scientist Tu Youyou earned the Nobel Prize for medicine, almost 50 years after she discovered artemisinin—otherwise known as “humankind’s best defense” against malaria.